10 WORST cheeses ever!

Hey guys! So Today i would like to make you guys recognize the 10 worst cheeses in the world shared by buzzfeed.com

Cottage cheese.

Cottage cheese.
Flickr: freeloosedirt / Creative Commons
"Tastes like slightly sour air.” - The cottage cheese marketing board.
Ricotta.
Ricotta.
Flickr: illuminato / Creative Commons
Cheese that’s full of lumps and tastes a bit like yoghurt

Emmental.

Emmental.
Flickr: chez_loulou / Creative Commons
Delicious in a sandwich with ham, mustard and gherkins, or in a fondue with other cheeses. On its own, though, a little bland and rubbery.

Feta.

Feta.
Flickr: lexnger / Creative Commons
The saltiest cheese of them all! Sometimes the benchmark for cheese is whether you can gnaw it straight from the block while gazing blearily into your fridge. Feta does not meet this benchmark, but luckily it’s perfect with black olives in a Greek salad, or even with cubed watermelon

 String cheese.

String cheese.
Lots of fun but a bit of a faff to use in a lasagna. Also cannot be used as actual string.

Goat’s cheese.

Goat's cheese.
Flickr: itto / Creative Commons
Horrible taste.

Wensleydale.

Wensleydale.
Flickr: richardnorth / Creative Commons
Ooh, Wensleydale. Made in Yorkshire since 1150, this cheese is crumbly and chalky and sometimes has a few cranberries stuck in it at Christmas-time. It does have a habit of falling off the cracker before you can get it in your mouth, though.

Edam.

Edam.
Flickr: serilium / Creative Commons
A bit mild on its own, but nutty and excellent melted in pasta and over vegetables. Extra points for its very stylish red wax rind.

Paneer.

Paneer.
Flickr: alaivani / Creative Commons
This South Asian curd cheese isn’t quite the right consistency for toast-based shenanigans, but really tasty when deep-fried, or cubed and baked in a tandoor as an alternative to meat.

Gorgonzola.

Gorgonzola.
Flickr: artizone / Creative Commons
Mould has never tasted so good. It’s creamy and blue (although really it’s green - it gets its marbling from a spore called Penicillium glaucum). It’s wonderful in pasta, on pizza, with figs, in a salad with pears, or any damn way you please.

Roquefort.

Roquefort.
Flickr: doozzle / Creative Commons
Tangy and blue, Roquefort was apparently first mentioned in literature by Pliny the Elder in AD 79. It’s made with sheep’s milk, and matured in caves in the south of France. Incomparable in a quiche (and meets the straight-from-the-fridge test, although in small doses). (c) 2016 buzzfeed.com (Wilder,2016)
We will stop here. See you in the posts!

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